SONG PREMIERE: Blues Singer Jo Harman Shares Inspired Anthem “Reformation”

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British singer-songwriter Jo Harman has been garnering praise in her home country for her unique vocal talents, with publications like The Daily Mirror saying she’s “on course to be the finest UK female blues soul voice.” Harman is ready to bring her powerful pipes to the world with the release of her second studio album on February 3rd via Sands Foley EntertainmentPeople We Become marks the biggest leap of Harman’s career. While a winter storm raged outside, Harman and producer Fred Mollin (Billy Joel, Joe Cocker, Carly Simon, Jimmy Webb) holed up inside Nashville’s famed Sound Emporium Studio for three weeks, focusing on a warm sound — full of upright piano, Rhodes, unaffected bursts of electric guitar, and the soulful sweep of Harman’s voice — that contrasted with the town’s snowy weather. The most striking instrument on the album is Harman’s voice, sharpened by her years on the road, and sounding better than ever.

Today Glide Magazine is excited to share an exclusive listen of one of the hardest hitting tracks on the album, “Reformation”. The song fires off with a thunderous beat and a mean guitar hook before Harman’s powerful vocals seem to strike like lightning. The singer is as much preaching the gospel as she is issuing a call to arms, and the song feels truly anthemic. It’s also oozing with slide guitar, bluesy riffs, and soaring harmonies.

Speaking on the inspiration for the song, Jo Harman has this to say:

“The inspiration for the song came through my work with Amnesty International. I’ve always felt fortunate for having been born in a country where I’m given full autonomy over my body, and my sexual and reproductive rights. I was devastated to learn the true extent of the reality in which many women live their lives, in many countries of the world.

The line ‘Hear Me Now’ has perhaps something of a double meaning. In effect it’s simultaneously about giving those victims a voice…objectively, and from the outside. But also they might refer to a ‘plea for help’ from those affected. But people should, as with all my lyrics, hear whatever they hear, and take whatever they want to take, in any of my words. I felt compelled to start a conversation, in whatever small way I could, about some of these issues. The message feels more important now than ever. #mybodymyrights”

LISTEN:

Jo Harman releases People We Become on February 3rd via Sands Foley Entertainment. For more music and info visit joharman.com. You can also check out her Pledge Music page

 

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