Golden Globes Ceremony Offers the Promise of Hope

THE 75TH GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS -- Pictured: "The 75th Golden Globe Awards" Logo -- (Photo by: NBC)

Last night’s Golden Globe awards were a powerful reminder that change is in the air. After months of being rocked by sexual harassment scandals, Hollywood showed out in force last night to remind the world that they too, like all of us, have had enough. Though often light and full of the typical pageantry that makes such occasions, you could tell immediately that the mood in the auditorium was not meant to be taken lightly. From the nearly all black attire, worn in solidarity for sexual harassment victims throughout the industry, to the recurring theme of women in power, this year’s Golden Globes harkened to the belief that this year would be the year the real change comes to Tinseltown.

It certainly felt that way when Oprah Winfrey took the stage to accept her Cecil B. DeMille award for lifetime achievement. Her rousing speech will no doubt go down as one of the best speeches in Golden Globe, perhaps even American, history. With an audience and a platform like no other, Winfrey reminded us both that enough is absolutely enough and that young girls across the nation and world should strive for something bigger, something better, than they might have previously believed. It was a call to arms, a rallying cry, an admonishment, and a ray of light rolled up into one. It was hard to deny her sentiment that, yes, “a new day is on the horizon.”

Indeed, that may be so but, as Natalie Portman was quick to point out, all nominees for Best Director this year were men. In the year that brought us Lady Bird, from director Greta Gerwig (which one Best Picture Musical or Comedy) and Detroit, from director Kathryn Bigelow (which has been sorely forgotten this awards season), there was certainly no lack of female contenders for the title. And yet you wouldn’t know that looking at the nominees. That new day may be within sight, but Hollywood still has a long way to go to achieve its promises.

But, if last night’s ceremony was any indication, it is, perhaps, not as far as it was even a few months ago. As Hollywood’s old power structure is being upended and dismantled, the women and men in the industry are busy trying to build a new power structure to take its place. One that’s inclusive of all races and all genders; one where women and people of color are seen as equals to their white male colleagues; one where newcomers don’t have to live in fear. In other words, one that’s more representative of the America we’d like to see. It’s a new dawn, indeed, and hopefully it brings a sunrise like we’ve never seen.

Golden Globe Winners

Movies

Best motion picture, drama: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best motion picture, musical or comedy: Lady Bird

Best director, motion picture: Guillermo del Toro, The Shape of Water

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, drama: Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, drama: Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, musical or comedy: Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy: James Franco, The Disaster Artist

Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in any motion picture: Allison Janney, I, Tonya

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in any motion picture: Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best screenplay, motion picture: Martin McDonagh, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best motion picture, animated: Coco

Best motion picture, foreign language: In the Fade

Best original score, motion picture: Alexandre Desplat, The Shape of Water

Best original song, motion picture: “This Is Me” — “The Greatest Showman

Television

Best television series, drama: The Handmaid’s Tale, Hulu

Best performance by an actress in a television series, drama: Elisabeth Moss, The Handmaid’s Tale

Best performance by an actor in a television series, drama: Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us

Best television series, musical or comedy: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Amazon

Best performance by an actress in a television series, musical or comedy: Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Best performance by an actor in a television series, musical or comedy: Aziz Ansari, Master of None

Best television limited series or motion picture made for television: Big Little Lies, HBO

Best performance by an actress in a limited series or motion picture made for television: Nicole Kidman, Big Little Lies

Best performance by an actor in a limited series or motion picture made for television: Ewan McGregor, Fargo

Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Laura Dern, Big Little Lies

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television: Alexander Skarsgard, Big Little Lies

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